The Top Ten Attractions in Ireland

Blarney Castle – Located in County Cork This historic castle is known for its “Blarney Stone.” Tradition is that if the Blarney Stone is kissed, one will be blessed with great eloquence, better known as “the gift of the gab.” One kisses the stone by lying back and being held by an employee of the castle. Photographers are there to capture the moment!

Cliffs of Moher – Located in County Clare One of Ireland’s biggest and most visited tourist attractions. The Cliffs are 230 meters in height and tower over the Atlantic Ocean. This attraction, whilst beautiful in the Summer, can be a bit of a tourist trap. If you intend to take your own transport, the over-priced car park is your only option (since the road is too narrow to park on) and to purchase your ‘pay-and-display’ parking ticket, you will need to go all the way through the gift shop (on the opposite side of the road), before returning to place it in your car.

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Kilkenny – One of Ireland’s favourite tourist spots, this Medieval Capital just 1 hour 40 minutes train out of Dublin City is a must see. Its beautiful buildings and of course imposing Norman Castle – not to mention the numerous festivals including the Arts Festival and Rhythm and Roots Festival – make Kilkenny a most desirable location.

Co. Donegal – An amazing area to see if you have your own transport, as bus services can be fairly limited. This part of the country is very traditional and you can expect to see plenty of low stone walls, thatched roof houses, rugged hills, cliffs and golden sand beaches. Best visited during Spring or Summer, there are plenty of hills walks and photo opportunities waiting to be discovered.

Guinness Storehouse is a Guinness-themed tourist attraction at St. James’s Gate Brewery in Dublin. Since opening in 2000, it has received over four million visitors. The Storehouse covers seven floors surrounding a glass atrium shaped in the form of a pint of Guinness. The ground floor introduces the beer’s four ingredients (water, barley, hops and yeast), and the brewery’s founder, Arthur Guinness. Other floors feature the history of Guinness advertising and include an interactive exhibit on responsible drinking. The seventh floor houses the Gravity Bar with views of Dublin and where visitors may drink a pint of Guinness included in the price of admission, which was €18 in March 2015

Dublin Zoo  in Phoenix Park, Dublin, Dublin Zoo is the largest zoo in Ireland and one of Dublin’s most popular attractions. Opened in 1831, the zoo describes its role as conservation, study, and education. Its stated mission is to “work in partnership with zoos worldwide to make a significant contribution to the conservation of the endangered species on Earth”

The Rock of Cashel was the traditional seat of the kings of Munster for several hundred years prior to the Norman invasion. In 1101, the King of Munster, Muirchertach Ua Briain, donated his fortress on the Rock to the Church. The picturesque complex has a character of its own and is one of the most remarkable collections of Celtic art and medieval architecture to be found anywhere in Europe. Few remnants of the early structures survive; the majority of buildings on the current site date from the 12th and 13th centuries.

Brú na Bóinne (Palace of the Boyne) is a World Heritage Site in County Meath, Ireland and is the largest and one of the most important complex of Megalithic sites in Europe, dating to the Neolithic period. The complex is situated around a wide bend in the River Boyne. The site is a complex of Neolithic mounds, chamber tombs, standing stones, henges and other prehistoric enclosures, some from as early as 35th century BC – 32nd century BC. The site predates the Egyptian pyramids and was built with sophistication and a knowledge of science and astronomy

The Library of Trinity College Dublin serves Trinity College and the University of Dublin. It is the largest library in Ireland and, as a legal deposit or “copyright library”, it has rights to receive material published in the Republic of Ireland free of charge; it is also the only Irish library to hold such rights for the United Kingdom. The Library is the permanent home to the famous Book of Kells. Two of the four volumes are on public display, one opened to a major decorated page and the other to a typical page of text. The volumes and pages shown are regularly changed

St Patrick’s Cathedral in Dublin, also known as The National Cathedral and Collegiate Church of Saint Patrick, Dublin, or in the Irish language as Ard-Eaglais Naomh Pádraig, founded in 1191, is the largest church in Ireland and one of Dublin’s two Church of Ireland cathedrals. It has a 43-metre (140 feet) spire.

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